Police Ride-along

On Monday 15 June I did one of many ride-alongs that I will be doing.  Some times they are boring, but for the most part they are quite interesting.  So far every police officer has been very caring and considerate.

The officer told me that when the guys are sitting in front of a house, I know where they are.  He knows many of the people in the area and they know him.  He and his wife want to open up a PAL Center.  He coaches high school football.

We had a drug check and five cars and eight officers responded on North Milton Avenue. 

We then had a traffic accident.  The woman said to me when we arrived, “Thank you for the quickness.”  Two police cars backed us up and one left and later another car came.  The officer advised them to use their cell phones to take photos of the accident for insurance purposes.  At the end the ladies said to the officers, “Thank you, officers, kindly.”

We then went on a “stolen car” call.  The officer Jones check the State and two tow companies to see where the car might be.  He does not think that it was stolen.

The woman had her title with her and he used it to find the tag number and then had the tags traced.  The car was officially stolen and towed to Loch Raven.  It was a bail out.  Apparently her boy friend took the car and drove it some place and was stopped by the police and when they stopped him, he fled on foot.  The officer Jones had to drop the case and turned it over to another officer who was already handling it.  He gave the woman the contact information for the officer.

Around 12:15 we answered an armed robbery call.  The victim is a former police officer and gave the robber the battery to his phone hoping to get his finger prints on it.  The robber took his ignition key.

We canvassed the area looking for keys and a cell phone battery.  We also went to the Johns Hopkins Metro station and there contacted the Lexington Market station since that is where the robber wanted to go.  There was nothing on the monitor at the subway station.  One officer thought that he might had ditched the sweater but another said that if he did, how would he hide the gun. 

The suspect was not belligerent.  He was almost polite.  In 1972 there were 13 taxi cab murders.

We went to City Wide Robbery.  The last time that the victim was held up was in 1998 and he got relaxed about it.

When we were at the City Wide Robbery, a detective asked me, “Did you get all that gray hair from today?”  We arrived around 13:10.  If a cab driver is robbed, he is the reporter and the victim is the business.

The victim told us that in one robbery the man held the gun at his ear and fired but it did not go off.  He grabbed the gun and was beating the man when a police officer came and jumped on him.

 

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